Tarte Flambée or Flammkuchen

Summer is gone and fall is here. The hot weather said good-bye, and we can slowly prepare for the cooler season. Fall is a wonderful season, especially for photographers: the light is special, the air is clear and the fall or autumn colors are just breathtaking.

Also in the kitchen their will be some changes. The light, sweet and fruity summer dishes slowly change into more savory, ‘hearty’ dishes. One of these is the Flammkuchen which you can find in many parts of Germany, France, Belgium and other countries. It’s a typical Alsace specialty, also Rhineland-Palatinate and Baden-Württemberg, a region that is today part German and part French. You drink some young wine, like Federweisser, with it, best sitting outside in the garden with friends.

It has a few names, all similar, like Flammeküacha, Flammekuechle Tarte Flambée or Flammkuchen. It looks like a pizza but the dough is actually a bread dough, just very thinly rolled out. Traditionally the topping is made of onion rings, bacon cubes and crème fraĭche (seasoned with salt and pepper). But like always there are many variations.

The Flammkuchen once was used to verify the temperature in the wood-fired oven. If the dough would be cooked too fast the oven was not yet ready for the bread which needs a lightly cooler environment. So practically the people used a little bread dough, rolled it out thinly, topped it with something simple like creme, onions and bacon and put the ‘heat-tester’ in the oven. Burning it it would be less ‘hurtful’ than a whole bread!

I used the same dough I used for a baguette and as topping I omit the crème fraĭche and instead put a couple of eggs. This was a perfect lunch for me, together with a salad.

Did you ever heard about Flammkuchen? Did you try it? Did you like it? Was it a traditional one? Did you have Federweisser or other young wine with it? Don’t mix up the Flammkuchen with Onion Cake which is made completely different!

Baguette
Baguette
Print Recipe
Servings Prep Time
2 15 minutes
Passive Time
1 hour
Servings Prep Time
2 15 minutes
Passive Time
1 hour
Baguette
Baguette
Print Recipe
Servings Prep Time
2 15 minutes
Passive Time
1 hour
Servings Prep Time
2 15 minutes
Passive Time
1 hour
Instructions
  1. Put all ingredients in a bowl and mix well until you get a smooth bread dough. Cover the dough with some saran wrap and let the dough rise for one hour in a warm ambiance.
  2. Preheat the oven to 220°C/430°F.
  3. With wet hands divide the bread dough into 4 equal pieces and form with your hands a small baguette. Put every one in one of the baguette baking forms.
  4. Place a bowl with water on the bottom of the oven and the baguette baking tray mid-height.
  5. Bake for 20 minutes, until golden on the top.
  6. When they are ready take them out of the oven and let them cool completely before eating,
Recipe Notes

You should not eat any baking goods with yeast when they are still warm, but it is so delicious, especially with some herb butter!

As the little baguettes are like long rolls, it is not necessary to cut them in slices.

If you prefer a bigger baguette, just take another baguette baking form (for two big) and bake for 30 minutes.

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120 Hectare of Pure Joy

Ludwigslust Palace is a wonderful palace just 40 kilometers south of Schwerin. And like all great royal homes it has a very huge park for leisure. The gardens are open all year long and there is no entrance-fee required. The best time to visit them is together with the palace during spring and summer time when all is in bloom.

We visited the park during summer and it took us two hours to walk only in the nearest surroundings of the palace. We saw a few of the many attractions.

The park is one of the biggest and various parks of the Mecklenburg-Vorpommern region in the north-east of Germany. It has many bridges, water features, a Mausoleum, a church, a Swiss house and a lot of old trees.

Around 1760 the park was created in the Baroque style of the time and included part of a mixed woodland. In the middle of the 19th century the park was changed again by Peter Joseph Lennés.

You find a Neo-Gothic church (the first in Mecklenburg), a Catholic church from 1803, there is a mausoleum of the Princess Helena Pawlowna, duchess of Mecklenburg-Schwerin, from 1806, there are several pavilons and busts, sculptures and even an artificial grotto (which didn’t impressed me much).

The park has many canals with the longest of 28 kilometers. They were used in the first moment for transporting the construction material and only later became part of the garden design. They are beautiful, especially the main canal with a lot of flowers, cascades and water features.

Beautiful is the stone bridge. In the right light you can take amazing pictures here. It was built in 1780.

The Swiss cottage was once the summer house of the duchess and still looks like from another world. Unfortunately it was closed the days we visited the park, and we couldn’t even look inside. The cottage was built in 1789/90 as a country cottage for the duchess Louise. On the upper floor there are mural paintings I would have liked to see. It is not sure if they are realized by the Italian painter Pietro de Angelo.

The Catholic church is beautiful, especially in the early evening sun. It was completed in 1809 and is the second oldest Catholic church in Mecklenburg. Neo-Gothic and brick, three-aisled interior, octagonal pillars, a wooden stellar vault and very high lancet windows – a real masterpiece of architecture. The bell tower is separated nearby on the other side of the church pond.

I enjoyed my whole time in Ludwigslust but mostly in the park. Amazing nature and a real good eye for the combination of different places, alleys, ponds, benches where to rest, bridges…. I can see how the duchess and the duke, the ladies-in-waiting and visitors liked to stroll in this environment.










Ludwigslust, Mecklenburg-Vorpommern/Germany:

For more information:
If you want to see more pictures about Ludwigslust Palace
More about the region Mecklenburg-Vorpommern


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A Church in the Guise of a Dorian Temple

The church is part of the ensemble of the Ludwigslust Palace in Mecklenburg-Vorpommern, just 40 kilometers south from Schwerin. The church is the most unexpected I have ever seen. The front or facade looks like a Dorian temple.

The church was once part of the palace and is today the church of the city Ludwigslust. You will notice the building immediately when you arrive at the palace. The church is facing the palace and is located some 500 meters away with a kind of little park in between.

The very unsusual church was built in order of Frederick II, Duke of Mecklenburg-Schwerin (called also the Pious) in 1765 and was finished 5 years later. The architect Johann Joachim Busch created a masterpiece. The church is also the burial place of the duke and the duchess.

The front looks like a Dorian temple. The portikus is 39 meters long and 7 meters large. The six columns are 14 meters high and the frieze is highly decorated. The christogram on the top is 7 meters high and more than a thousand kilogram heavy. 4 apostles are staying also on the top of the church.

Before you enter the church, I recommend going around the building. You will be surprised what you see!

When you enter you will have the second surprise: it is an aisleless church with 8 columns on both sides which are only for decoration. The church itself is built in brick and very wide. Inside it is bright, full of light and has an unusual altar with two staircases on both sides and a huge painting in the back. Behind the painting, also unusual, there is the church organ.

It doesn’t stop with the unusualness though: most of the decoration is made of papier maché. Yes, it seems very strange but true. Also in the palace all the gold decoration and other are made out of papier machè and look like plaster. The painting is actually also papier machè, three-dimensional. Lift your nose and be amazed by a decorated ceiling as well! Here you will also notice the clock and maybe if you look at it for a second more you will also notice it has only one hand, the longer one. It indicates the hours only and is connected to the clock outside the church, also with one hand only. The clockwork regulates both.

When in front of the altar, turn and have a look at the beautiful loggia for the duke and family. It was the only part in the church that could be heated in winter-time. On the top of the loggia there is the balcony for the court orchestra.

In the middle of the church you can see the sarcophagus of the duke. The pulpit is not located at the side like in most churches but right in the middle of the altar.

The bell tower is outside the church in a different building.

This church is an amazing example how to create illusions. Already from outside it seems something very different and inside it continuous to surprise the visitor.

I recommend going immediately after the palace as the church could close before you can see it. The chaplain closes the doors when he thinks no visitor will come anymore. After the visit go back to the palace and into the coffee-shop to let the impressions sink in before you walk through the amazing park of the palace.

The whole ensemble needs a whole day to not be overwhelmed too much. It is one of the most beautiful examples of architecture and beauty of the past.










Ludwigslust, Mecklenburg-Vorpommern/Germany:

For more information:
If you want to see more pictures about Ludwigslust Palace
More about the region Mecklenburg-Vorpommern


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Pomp and Splendor in the Ludwigslust Palace

This summer I was exploring another palace in the Mecklenburg-Vorpommern region in northeast Germany. Pomp and splendor on a high level, surrounded by an enormous park, a so-called palace garden and with a very unique church facing the palace. I would compare this with the Sanssouci Palace in Potsdam near Berlin.

One of the many various things I did this year was the visit in Ludwigslust. The day started by driving east with the goal of a coast town, changed already after 20 kilometers into ‘let’s go to Schwerin’ where is another palace and changed again then into Ludwigslust, south of Schwerin. Mainly because I have never been there. And for my sweet sweetie it was both the same: he didn’t know any of them. And for me it was a great surprise.

Ludwigslust is just about 40 kilometers south from Schwerin, half an hour drive through a very nice landscape with a lot of forests. We arrived in the little town around noon and found a parking space right in front of the very big palace.

The first thing I noticed was the cascade opposite to the enormous entrance of the building and more far away the Greek temple like church. All calling for long visits.

Ludwigslust once was just a hunting lodge for the duke Frederick II of Mecklenburg-Schwerin who had his main seat in the Schwerin palace. It was first built in 1724, so not that long ago, by Prince Christian Ludwig. 20 years later he became the reigning duke and changed the name from Klenow (the name of the area before) into Ludwig’s joy (Ludwigslust) and made it his main residence.

During the years of construction and of course later the place grew from a very little village to a town. Today there are still the housings of the people who worked for and in the palace along the way to the catholic church. The castle or palace was rebuilt between 1772 and 1776 to plans of Johann Joachim Busch in a late Baroque style. The E-shape is better visible from the back side. The duke liked clearly a mixture of old styles: Corinthian in the central blog, Ionic in the side wings, some Neoclassical style in the facade and a Doric portico. Brick and sandstone were used as construction material. The (40) statues on the roof give it an interesting look, like people are walking on the top of the palace.

We bought a ticket to visit the inside, the gardens and the church opposite.

One of the first rooms we saw was the golden hall (Goldener Saal). Beautiful, I liked the mirrors in which you could overview even more. Mirrors were often put in big halls to make them even bigger but also to multiply the candle light and make the room much brighter. Very impressive are the Corinthian columns, the very decorated ceiling and the wonderful wooden floor. To watch people dancing on the floor from the surrounding balconies must have been such a joy.

We walked through a lot of other rooms like the private ones of the duke and duchess.

Inside the palace there is also a restaurant with a terrace facing the gardens, a perfect place to rest after a walk through the amazing palace and enjoying the sunshine, before you walk over or to the church or through the huge (120 hectare) park.

When the last duke abdicated in 1918, the palace was used as a residence for the family. After 1945 it hosted various administrative offices and is today a museum, open to the public.

The cascade opposite to the entrance of the palace on the Schlossplatz (palace square) was originally built in wood and only later changed into sandstone. The water feature was built in the years 1780 to 1785 and was connected at the canal system of the palace gardens. During wintertime the water still flows and not seldom gets ice sculptures.

We enjoyed our stay very much. It was only half a day, we saw also the church and the gardens, but it should be a whole day. There is so much to see and enjoy, not to hurry through all of it. We didn’t visit the village at all.














Ludwigslust, Mecklenburg-Vorpommern/Germany:

For more information:
If you want to see more pictures about Ludwigslust Palace
More about the region Mecklenburg-Vorpommern


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Sandy views – Beach Impressions

Beach, beach, beach – I walked this summer a few times along the shore of an ocean or sea and enjoyed a little photography there. Here are some of my beach impressions, some are a little altered for fun.

Enjoy the photos!


























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